The Aquatic Gazette

ADA 30C Cube Garden

In Tank on June 8, 2011 at 00:01

What good are we as an aquatic gazette if we do not have a resident tank? With that in mind, we have embarked on building a resident tank and the tank we have chosen is an ADA 30C, a cube tank measuring 30cm in length, 30cm in depth and 30cm in height. The ADA 30C is a rimless tank, build with glass of high clarity and joined together by neat silicon work, all hallmarks of an ADA cube garden (ADA’s term for tanks).

A rimless tank is always our preferred aquarium tank, not only does it allow for effective photography, but also in daily viewing, in which the aquascape is always the unchallenged focus. A rimless ADA cube garden is beautiful in its simplicity and inconspicuous in nature, but these strengths also bring about a unique challenge in equipment selection.

There is not much sense in investing in an ADA cube garden and then cluttering the look with equipment such as an internal filters or surface skimmers. We would be the first to admit that there is nothing wrong with using such equipment. But to purchase such a tank that is much more expensive than a normal tank, is to also make an effort towards your equipment being similarly inconspicuous. There are numerous manufacturers that produce equipment suitable for such a tank. If care is taken to outfit such a tank with low profile equipment, your aquascape will be of more prominence.

We really do appreciate the clarity of the ADA 30C, and this clarity applies to all cube gardens that ADA produces. There are multiple build threads on numerous forums that provide an idea of how clear the ADA cube gardens are, but we feel that this clarity will only be fully appreciated when the aquascape is viewed daily, through this glass. This level of clarity also presents a more accurate view of your aquascape as it lacks the green tinge found in normal tanks.

In an interview on the glass that ADA uses, Takashi Amano notes that: “this clearer glass gives a brighter impression, because it lacks the green tinge which darkens the aquascape. To achieve this level of clarity, a softer glass had to be used as compared to normal glass.”

Because a softer glass is used, it is thus more susceptible to scratches as compared to normal glass tank. However, being careful around the tank and with the minute nature of these scratches, there should be no visible evidence of any damage. We will follow up on this softer glass and see if we do get more scratches than our usual glass tanks over time.

Besides their rimless appearance, ADA tanks are known for their excellent construction and extremely need silicon work. We did two macro shots of the silicon work on our 30C to give you an idea of how neat they are. Even when we ordered customised, rimless glass tanks with special instructions for neat silicon work, our local tank makers were never close to this standard.

The glass that made our tank was cut perfectly, every corner and edge was perfect and smooth, truly a work to behold. The entire construction is so precise, so delicate, bonded with clear silicon that almost does not exist, makes us wonder how such a tank keeps 30kg of water behind its walls.

Here is another picture of the glass construction with silicon work at one of the corners.

If your desire of an aquarium tank is for one of the best constructed tanks with a beautiful simplicity to it, we would highly recommend an ADA cube garden. Although you will be paying a premium for your purchase, such a tank is well worth it, and all ADA cube gardens come with a three year warranty, so you can be assure that your investment is well protected.

Our hardscape on the first try. Let us know what you think of it!

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credit: Aqua Design Amano

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